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Numerator

Number of persons aged 18 years and over who report light or moderate physical activity for at least 150 minutes per week or who report vigorous physical activity 75 minutes per week or an equivalent combination of moderate and vigorous activity

Denominator

Number of persons aged 18 years and over

Methodology

From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey:

[NUMERATOR:]

The next questions are about physical activities (exercise, sports, physically active hobbies...) that you may do in your LEISURE time.

How often do you do VIGOROUS LEISURE-TIME physical activities for AT LEAST 10 MINUTES that cause HEAVY sweating or LARGE increases in breathing or heart rate?

[Read if necessary:] How many times per day, per week, per month, or per year do you do these activities?

  1. Never
  2. Unable to do this type activity
  3. _____ times per day/week/month/year
  4. Refused
  5. Don't know

Adults are classified as meeting the objective if they participate in at least 150 minutes of light or moderate leisure-time activity per week, 75 minutes of vigorous activity, or 150 minutes per week of an equivalent combination of activity. Total minutes per week of light or moderate-intensity activity are calculated by multiplying the times per week adults report participating in light or moderate-intensity activity by the number of minutes reported. Total minutes per week of vigorous-intensity activity are calculated by multiplying the times per week adults report participating in vigorous-intensity activity by the number of minutes reported. To calculate minutes per week for the equivalent combination of moderate and vigorous-intensity activity, minutes per week of light or moderate-intensity activity are added to two times the minutes per week of vigorous-intensity activity.

If responses meet the criteria for one activity (vigorous or moderate) but the status of the other activity is unknown, the record is included in the numerator and the denominator. If responses do not meet the criteria for one activity and the status of the other activity is unknown, the record is dropped from the analysis.


This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

  • Total: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
  • Sex: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
  • Race/Ethnicity: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
  • Educational Attainment: 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
  • Family Income: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
  • Family Type: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
  • Country of Birth: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
  • Disability Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
  • Geographic Location: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
  • Health Insurance Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64
  • Marital Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+

Caveats

Since the Numerator questions focus on leisure-time physical activities only, these data may not include physical activity by people whose jobs require regular or vigorous physical activity.

References

1. Chong, Y.; Klein, R.; Plepys, C.; et al. Operational definitions for year 2000 objectives: Priority area 1, Physical Activity and Fitness. Healthy People 2000 Statistical Notes, No. 18. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 1998.

2. Klein, R.J.; Proctor, S.E.; Boudreault, M.A.; Turczyn, K.M. Healthy People 2010 Criteria for Data Suppression. Statistical Notes No. 24. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2002.

Interventions

Behavioral and Social Approaches to Increase Physical Activity: Social Support Interventions in Community Settings

These social support interventions focus on changing physical activity behavior through building, strengthening, and maintaining social networks that provide supportive relationships for behavior change (e.g., setting up a buddy system, making contracts with others to complete specified levels of physical activity, or setting up walking groups or other groups to provide friendship and support).

Worksite Programs to Control Overweight and Obesity

Worksite nutrition and physical activity programs are designed to improve health-related behaviors and health outcomes.

Behavioral and Social Approaches to Increase Physical Activity: Individually-adapted Health Behavior Change Programs

Individually-adapted health behavior change programs to increase physical activity teach behavioral skills to help participants incorporate physical activity into their daily routines.

Campaigns and Informational Approaches to Increase Physical Activity: Community-wide Campaigns

Community-wide campaigns to increase physical activity: involve many community sectors; include highly visible, broad-based, component strategies; and may also address other cardiovascular disease risk factors.

Behavioral and Social Approaches to Increase Physical Activity: Social Support Interventions in Community Settings

This intervention includes: an assessment of personal health habits and risk factors; an estimation or assessment of risk of death and other adverse health outcomes; and, provision of feedback in the form of educational messages and counseling.

Environmental and Policy Approaches to Increase Physical Activity: Point-of-decision Prompts to Encourage Use of Stairs

point-of-decision prompts as effective in moderately increasing levels of physical activity, on the basis of strong evidence that they are effective in increasing the percentage of people choosing to take the stairs rather than an elevator or escalator.

Environmental and Policy Approaches to Increase Physical Activity: Creation of or Enhanced Access to Places for Physical Activity Combined with Informational Outreach Activities

Creation of or enhancing access to places for physical activity involves the efforts of worksites, coalitions, agencies, and communities as they attempt to change the local environment to create opportunities for physical activity. Such changes include creating walking trails, building exercise facilities, or providing access to existing nearby facilities.

Environmental and Policy Approaches to Increase Physical Activity: Community-Scale Urban Design Land Use Policies & Practices

Community-scale urban design land use policies and practices involve the efforts of urban planners, architects, engineers, developers, and public health professionals to change the physical environment of urban areas of several square miles or more in ways that support physical activity.

Environmental and Policy Approaches to Increase Physical Activity: Street Scale Urban Design Land Use Policies & Practices

Street-scale urban design and land use policies involve the efforts of urban planners, architects, engineers, developers, and public health professionals to change the physical environment of small geographic areas, generally limited to a few blocks, in ways that support physical activity.