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Numerator

Number of coronary heart disease-related deaths (ICD-10 codes I20-I25)

Denominator

Number of persons

Methodology


Death due to ischemic heart diseases (acute myocardial infarction, other acute ischemic heart diseases, and other forms of chronic ischemic heart disease), ICD-10 codes: I20-I25.

FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

FOR MULTIPLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the sum of the resident populations for each of the data years involved (e.g. the denominator of a rate for 2008-2010 combined is the sum of the population estimates for 2008, 2009, and 2010). For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.


This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

  • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
  • Sex:< 1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
  • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
  • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
  • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
  • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+

Trend Issues

Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Achievements in public health, 1990 1999: Decline in deaths from heart disease and stroke--United States, 1990-1999. MMWR 1999;48(30):649-56.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Achievements in public health, 1990 1999: Decline in deaths from heart disease and stroke--United States, 1990-1999. MMWR 1999;48(30):649-56. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm4830a1.htm.

Interventions

Behavioral and Social Approaches to Increase Physical Activity: Social Support Interventions in Community Settings

These social support interventions focus on changing physical activity behavior through building, strengthening, and maintaining social networks that provide supportive relationships for behavior change (e.g., setting up a buddy system, making contracts with others to complete specified levels of physical activity, or setting up walking groups or other groups to provide friendship and support).

Worksite Programs to Control Overweight and Obesity

Worksite nutrition and physical activity programs are designed to improve health-related behaviors and health outcomes.

Behavioral and Social Approaches to Increase Physical Activity: Individually-adapted Health Behavior Change Programs

Individually-adapted health behavior change programs to increase physical activity teach behavioral skills to help participants incorporate physical activity into their daily routines.

Campaigns and Informational Approaches to Increase Physical Activity: Community-wide Campaigns

Community-wide campaigns to increase physical activity: involve many community sectors; include highly visible, broad-based, component strategies; and may also address other cardiovascular disease risk factors.

Behavioral and Social Approaches to Increase Physical Activity: Social Support Interventions in Community Settings

This intervention includes: an assessment of personal health habits and risk factors; an estimation or assessment of risk of death and other adverse health outcomes; and, provision of feedback in the form of educational messages and counseling.

Environmental and Policy Approaches to Increase Physical Activity: Point-of-decision Prompts to Encourage Use of Stairs

point-of-decision prompts as effective in moderately increasing levels of physical activity, on the basis of strong evidence that they are effective in increasing the percentage of people choosing to take the stairs rather than an elevator or escalator.

Environmental and Policy Approaches to Increase Physical Activity: Creation of or Enhanced Access to Places for Physical Activity Combined with Informational Outreach Activities

Creation of or enhancing access to places for physical activity involves the efforts of worksites, coalitions, agencies, and communities as they attempt to change the local environment to create opportunities for physical activity. Such changes include creating walking trails, building exercise facilities, or providing access to existing nearby facilities.

Environmental and Policy Approaches to Increase Physical Activity: Community-Scale Urban Design Land Use Policies & Practices

Community-scale urban design land use policies and practices involve the efforts of urban planners, architects, engineers, developers, and public health professionals to change the physical environment of urban areas of several square miles or more in ways that support physical activity.

Environmental and Policy Approaches to Increase Physical Activity: Street Scale Urban Design Land Use Policies & Practices

Street-scale urban design and land use policies involve the efforts of urban planners, architects, engineers, developers, and public health professionals to change the physical environment of small geographic areas, generally limited to a few blocks, in ways that support physical activity.

Behavioral and Social Approaches to Increase Physical Activity: Enhanced School-based Physical Education

This review evaluated the effectiveness of enhancing physical education (PE) curricula by making classes longer or having students be more active during class in order to increase the amount of time students spend doing moderate or vigorous activity in PE class.

Screening for High Blood Pressure

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for high blood pressure in adults aged 18 and older.

Screening for Lipid Disorders in Adults

The USPSTF strongly recommends screening women aged 45 and older for lipid disorders if they are at increased risk for coronary heart disease.

Screening for Lipid Disorders in Adults

The USPSTF recommends screening men aged 20 to 35 for lipid disorders if they are at increased risk for coronary heart disease.

Screening for Lipid Disorders in Adults

The USPSTF recommends screening women aged 20 to 45 for lipid disorders if they are at increased risk for coronary heart disease.

Screening for Lipid Disorders in Adults

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) strongly recommends screening men aged 35 and older for lipid disorders.

Screening for Obesity in Adults

The USPSTF recommends that clinicians screen all adult patients for obesity and offer intensive counseling and behavioral interventions to promote sustained weight loss for obese adults.

Screening for Obesity in Children and Adolescents

The USPSTF recommends that clinicians screen children aged 6 years and older for obesity and offer them or refer them to comprehensive, intensive behavioral interventions to promote improvement in weight status.

Behavioral Counseling in Primary Care to Promote a Healthy Diet

The USPSTF recommends intensive behavioral dietary counseling for adult patients with hyperlipidemia and other known risk factors for cardiovascular and diet-related chronic disease. Intensive counseling can be delivered by primary care clinicians or by referral to other specialists, such as nutritionists or dietitians.

Aspirin for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

The USPSTF recommends the use of aspirin for men age 45 to 79 years when the potential benefit due to a reduction in myocardial infarctions outweighs the potential harm due to an increase in gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

Healthy Youth! Nutrition

The USPSTF recommends that clinicians screen all adult patients for obesity and offer intensive counseling and behavioral interventions to promote sustained weight loss for obese adults.

Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005

The USPSTF recommends that clinicians screen children aged 6 years and older for obesity and offer them or refer them to comprehensive, intensive behavioral interventions to promote improvement in weight status.