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Numerator

Number of motor vehicle traffic-related deaths [ICD-10 codes V02-V04 (.1, .9), V09.2, V12-V14 (.3-.9), V19 (.4-.6), V20-V28 (.3-.9), V29-V79 (.4-.9), V80 (.3-.5), V81.1, V82.1, V83-V86 (.0-.3), V87 (.0-.8), V89.2]

Denominator

Number of persons

Methodology


FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

FOR MULTIPLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the sum of the resident populations for each of the data years involved (e.g. the denominator of a rate for 2008-2010 combined is the sum of the population estimates for 2008, 2009, and 2010). For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.


This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

  • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
  • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
  • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
  • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
  • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
  • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
  • Trend Issues

    Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

    Interventions

    Use of Safety Belts: Enhanced Enforcement Programs

    Enhanced enforcement programs are added to normal enforcement practices and include publicity.

    Use of Safety Belts: Laws Mandating Use

    Safety belt laws mandate the use of safety belts by motor vehicle occupants.

    Use of Safety Belts: Primary (vs. Secondary) Enforcement Laws

    Primary safety belt laws allow police to stop motorists solely for being unbelted.

    Behavioral and Social Approaches to Increase Physical Activity: Social Support Interventions in Community Settings

    This intervention includes: an assessment of personal health habits and risk factors; an estimation or assessment of risk of death and other adverse health outcomes; and, provision of feedback in the form of educational messages and counseling.

    Use of Child Safety Seats: Distribution and Education Programs

    Child safety seat distribution and education programs provide child safety seats to parents through a loan, low-cost rental or giveaway of an approved safety seat.

    Use of Child Safety Seats: Incentive and Education Programs

    Incentive and education programs reward parents for correctly using child safety seats or directly reward children for correctly using safety seats.

    Use of Child Safety Seats: Laws Mandating Use

    Child safety seat laws require children riding in motor vehicles to be restrained in federally approved infant or child safety seats.

    Reducing Alcohol-impaired Driving: 0.08% Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) Laws

    These laws state that it is illegal for a driver’s blood alcohol concentration to exceed 0.08%.

    Reducing Alcohol-impaired Driving: Intervention Training Programs for Servers of Alcoholic Beverages

    These programs provide education and training to servers of alcoholic beverages with the goal of altering their serving practices to prevent customer intoxication and alcohol-impaired driving.

    Reducing Alcohol-impaired Driving: Lower BAC Laws for Young or Inexperienced Drivers

    In the United States, lower blood alcohol concentration (BAC) laws apply to all drivers under the age of 21.

    Reducing Alcohol-impaired Driving: Maintaining Current Minimum Legal Drinking Age (MLDA) Laws

    MLDA laws specify an age below which the purchase or public consumption of alcoholic beverages is illegal.

    Reducing Alcohol-impaired Driving: Multicomponent Interventions with Community Mobilization

    Multicomponent interventions to reduce alcohol-impaired driving can include any or all of a number of components, such as sobriety checkpoints, training in responsible beverage service, education and awareness-raising efforts, and limiting access to alcohol. Interventions that qualified for this review (1) implemented multiple programs and/or policies in multiple settings to effect the community environment to reduce alcohol-impaired driving, and (2) included participation of active community coalitions or task forces in their design or execution (community mobilization).

    Reducing Alcohol-impaired Driving: Sobriety Checkpoints

    At sobriety checkpoints, law enforcement officers use a system to stop drivers to assess their level of alcohol impairment.

    Reducing Alcohol Impaired Driving: Ignition Interlocks

    Ignition interlocks are devices that can be installed in motor vehicles to prevent operation of the vehicle by a driver who has a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) above a specified level (usually 0.02% – 0.04%).

    Reducing Alcohol-impaired Driving: School-based Programs

    School-based programs to reduce alcohol-impaired driving include instructional programs to address the problems of drunk driving (DD) and riding with drunk drivers (RDD) alone, or have a broader focus on alcohol or other substance use.

    Reducing Alcohol Impaired Driving: Mass Media Campaigns

    Mass media campaigns intended to reduce alcohol-impaired driving are designed to persuade individuals either to avoid drinking and driving or to prevent others from doing so. Common campaign themes include fear of arrest; fear of injury to self, others, or property; and characterizing drinking drivers as irresponsible and dangerous to others.